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Sikhs a Minority in Punjab in 34 years we wrote 8 years ago

Sikhs  a Minority in Punjab in 34 years we wrote 8 years ago

Here is what we noticed on internet. The scholars were discussing on demography predicting how Sikhs r going to be a minority.. Unfortunately despite census results out no Sikh of note has taken notice of this impending danger. I reproduce my 2007 post on yahoogroups.




2173    Sikhs will be a Minority in Punjab in 34 years- Census figures - TOI
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B.S.GorayaJan 30, 2007
"If Naidu does need some impending demographic
imbalance to worry about, there is a more proximate
candidate available. The Sikh population in Punjab
grew by 14.3 per cent between 1991 and 2001; the Hindu
population of the state grew by 28.7 per cent over the
same period. In 2001, Sikhs constituted just under 60
per cent of the state's population while Hindus
constituted about 37 per cent. If both groups maintain
their current growth rates, Punjab will have as many
Hindus as Sikhs by 2041, just about 37 years from now.
Isn't it interesting that this particular demographic
shift does not seem to bother Naidu or his partymen?
Perhaps while all demographic shifts are equal, some
are more equal than others.”


Sorry, Wrong Number: Venkaiah Naidu And The 247-Year
Hitch
By Shankar Raghuraman
11 September, 2004
Times Of India
BJP president Venkaiah Naidu says the differential
growth rates for Hindu and Muslim populations in India
are a matter of "grave concern" for those bothered
about the country's unity and integrity. The
"imbalance", he suggests, raises "serious questions of
a long-term nature" when seen in conjunction with the
phenomenon of Bangladeshi infiltrators. To most normal
people, pseudo-secular as they are, it does not
automatically follow that if Muslims grow faster than
Hindus national unity is imperilled or that more
Indian Muslims being born is akin to infiltration from
across the eastern borders. But, then, such
connections are not only obvious but axiomatic to
those bred on the sangh parivar's ideology,
particularly on its cruder manifestations.
The paranoia that Hindus will one day be reduced to a
minority in India is neither new nor exclusive to
Naidu. It is as old as his ideological fraternity and
as widely shared. It is time perhaps to offer them
some statistical comfort. After making the necessary
adjustments to the Census data on religious groups
released a few days ago, it turns out that the Muslim
population has grown by 29.3 per cent over the last
decade, while the Hindu population has grown by 19.9
per cent.
Guess how long it would take, if these growth rates
were maintained, for Muslims to outnumber Hindus in
India. It's not a matter of a few years or even a few
decades. We would have to wait till the 2251 Census
for that to happen. That's about 247 years from where
we are located in time. Naidu can, therefore, exit
panic mode. In fact, he can do even better. He can
start celebrating. For, if Indian Hindus and Muslims
continued to grow at the current rates till the year
2251, their combined population by that date would be
about 158 billion. Since that's about 30 times the
current population of planet Earth, we would then
unquestionably rule the world, which is by all
accounts unlikely to come even close to matching such
growth over two and a half centuries.
If Naidu does need some impending demographic
imbalance to worry about, there is a more proximate
candidate available. The Sikh population in Punjab
grew by 14.3 per cent between 1991 and 2001; the Hindu
population of the state grew by 28.7 per cent over the
same period. In 2001, Sikhs constituted just under 60
per cent of the state's population while Hindus
constituted about 37 per cent. If both groups maintain
their current growth rates, Punjab will have as many
Hindus as Sikhs by 2041, just about 37 years from now.
Isn't it interesting that this particular demographic
shift does not seem to bother Naidu or his partymen?
Perhaps while all demographic shifts are equal, some
are more equal than others.
Has the BJP noticed that neither the Akalis nor anyone
else in Punjab is getting worked up about demographic
"imbalances" or perceiving them as threats to Punjab's
unity? If they have, they might ask themselves why
this is the case. Could it be that unlike Naidu the
average Punjabi, Sikh or otherwise, recognises that
numbers do not make communities more or less powerful?
If the BJP were to bother to study history it could
reach that conclusion on its own. The upper castes
have dominated Indian society, politics, industry...
not because they outnumber the rest. But, of course,
the sangh parivar is not much of a votary for studying
history. Itbelieves that making up your own history as
you go along is a rather more rewarding occupation,
apart from being more creatively satisfying.
But it could still look at the very demographic trends
it is so concerned about. If it is really true that
having larger numbers is an advantage, why is every
community moving in the other direction? Why are
growth rates coming down, not going up? Even more
importantly, it is surely no coincidence that as we
move up the socio-economic ladder, we find the growth
rate coming down. Thus, the more developed states tend
to have lower growth rates, communities with smaller
numbers of the socio-economically deprived again have
lower growth rates than those that have few people
among the privileged.
There may be temporary movements away from this trend,
but the long-term progress towards lower growth rates
is secular and across the religious spectrum. If Naidu
feels this trend needs to be accelerated, there are
simpler ways of achieving the goal than striving for a
uniform growth rate across communities.
Kerala has some pointers to offer on this score. The
prescription is obvious — raise literacy, particularly
female literacy, enhance economic growth and
distributive justice, make basic health facilities
accessible to all. Population stabilisation will
follow, not because the state mandates it as a goal,
but because it becomes rational for indivi-duals to
optimise the size of their families.
>From the BJP's point of view, however, there is a
serious problem with this pres-cription. It might
settle the demographic problem that the party is so
worked up about, but it will also in the process leave
no room for a paranoia that has served its political
cause rather well for decades.
That is a problem, of course, but luckily for the rest
of us, it is one that the sangh parivar has to
confront, not one that affects pseudo-secular Indians
like us. It certainly isn't one that threatens the
country's unity and integrity or pose serious
questions of a long-term nature that would have us
losing our sleep over them. Sorry Naidu, you're on
your own on this one.

B.S.Goraya
Editor/Moderator:-
Punjab Monitor Magazine
www.punjabmonitor.com
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